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Freedom of Expression and Political Censorship in the Context of Militarized States | Call for proposals | video book

What relationship can be established between freedom of expression, political censorship and militarized states? Far from answering this question, several challenges are unquestionably imposed on the current social, political and economic conjuncture in some Lusophone countries, specifically Brazil, Mozambique and Angola. These challenges lie at some point, based on principles of freedom, equality and respect for diversity of opinion, especially in the post-colonial context. However, the attacks made on political and governance processes reinforce the existence of political violence and politically institutionalized censorship, against those who develop a rhetoric in defense of social injustices in the relationship between State / government and society, sometimes as a result of the colonial heritage .
Various challenges are unquestionably imposed on the current social, political and economic conjuncture in some Lusophone countries, specifically Brazil, Mozambique and Angola. These challenges are at some point, based on principles of freedom, equality and respect for each other diversity of opinion, especially mind in the post-colonial context. However, the attacks made on political and governance processes reinforce the existence of political violence and politically institutionalized censorship, against those who develop a rhetoric in defense of social injustices in the relation between State and government and society, sometimes as a result of inheritance colonial.
As an example, in Brazil Marielle Franco known as a human rights activist, was shot after taking part in a political act in Rio de Janeiro, where she criticized the intervention of the Army in public safety. Not unlike Brazil, journalist Carlos Cardoso was assassinated in Mozambique when he investigated an alleged case of corruption in one of the largest banks. A case of intimidation, is also found in Angola, a process called “15 + 2” in which an activists Angolans were tried in the Provincial Court of Luanda, accused of preparing a coup against the MPLA government of José Eduardo dos Santos.
If, on the one hand, the State offered a space for the democratization of the media for life, freedom of expression and of the press, but also for the right to demonstrate, this same State, on the other hand, also offered a space for political persecution and intimidation against which has disagreed with the established political-governmental and partisan order. In this call for contributions, we intend to explore the various places that freedom of expression and political censorship have occupied, based on discursive narratives presented and reproduced by the various segments of society in the context of a Militarized State.
Selection criteria
  • We invite presentations with a minimum of 3 minutes and a maximum of 5 minutes. If the presentations are less than 3 minutes and more than 5 minutes will be automatically disqualified;
  • We especially welcome contributions that go beyond the work carried out in Brazil, Mozambique and Angola, but somehow allow us to establish a point of reflection with these countries;;
  • We encourage you to submit presentations from beginner and graduate students, activists, artists or experts established on these topics whether through musical or theatrical performances. These performances can be done individually or in a group;
  • Presentations should be concise and with accessible language;
  • Can be sent, presentations in Portuguese and English;
  • The video must have minimal qualities of image and sound;
  • We request unpublished presentations and unedited images.
Submission address of proposals:
Proposals should only be submitted by email [ libertade@bloco4foundation.org], using applications or dropbox accounts or wetransfer.
Important deadlines:
Submission of proposals must be made between the 30th of March 2019 and the 20th of June 2019. By July 30th, accepted proposals will receive a notification. In October 2019, the video-book will be available online to the interested public through a channel to be released.
About the organizers:
Tirso Sitoe is the founder, researcher fellow and Executive director of the Bloco 4 Foundation. Master and post-graduate in Intercultural Relations from Open University (UAB), Lisbon. The dissertation explored experiences on how the RAP of protest is a space where musicians and the audience exercise their civil rights and citizenship in post-colonial Mozambique. In 2012 he obtained his degree in Social Anthropology from Eduardo Mondlane University (UEM). In 2016, Tirso Sitoe was one of the young African leaders, selected for their commitment to the development of Africa, to integrate a group of people from all over the world, YALI Civic Leadership Training Program at the Regional Center for African Leadership Austral-Pretoria, offered by YALI- Regional Leadership Center, Mozambique.  He has collaborated in several international research projects with the Institute of Ethnomusicology INET-Md, headquartered at the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities of Nova de Lisboa University. His research focuses on areas such as youth cultures, sociability’s and processes of youth identification, citizenship, activism and human rights in Mozambique, spatial dynamics and social movements in urban context, Music criticism and social protest in post-colonial Mozambique, digital activism, technological artifacts as places of civic engagement and collective memory.
Marissa J. Moorman is the historian of Southern Africa. His research focuses on the intersection between politics and culture in colonial and independent Angola. My book Intonations (Ohio University Press, 2008) explores how music was a practice in and through which Angolans living under extreme political repression imagined the nation and how the particularities of music and historical moment cast this process in gendered terms. In other words, her research interested in the ways that cultural practice is productive of politics and not just derivative of it. Much of my evidence comes from interviews with musicians and consumers of music and explore how memory, experience, and pleasure shape politics and history. Radio, State Power, and the Cold War in Angola, 1933-2002 which looks at the relationship between the technology of radio and the shifting politics of southern Africa as anti-colonial movements established independent states in the context of a region newly charged by Cold War politics. This book attends to state dynamics of consolidation through techno-political processes and the human interferences that jam those grand plans.
His work looks at different media and how their uses, the practices and meanings people develop around them, and their relationship to power shift over time. Whether music, radio, film, or photography (sound or visual), I am interested in questions of mediation of presents that become pasts and the past as a discipline of study and published on music, fashion, film, radio, and urban space and has served in the editorial collective of Radical History Reviewand editorial board of Africa is a countrywhere I also contributed as a blogger.
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